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Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis (ORACBA)

The Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis (ORACBA) was established by the Federal Crop Insurance Reform and Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 1994 (P.L. 103-354, H.R.4271,
Section 304
).P.L. 103-354, H.R., Section 304 ORACBA began operation on April 15, 1995, in USDA's Office of the Chief Economist.

The Office of Risk Assessment and Cost-Benefit Analysis's (ORACBA) primary role is to ensure that major regulations proposed by USDA are based on sound scientific and economic analysis.

ORACBA News

ORACBA DIRECTOR

Dr. Linda Abbott gave a presentation on risk assessment at USDA to this year’s class of summer interns from Bangladesh, China, Taiwan, and Thailand on July 7th.  

APPLIED RISK COMMUNICATION FOR THE 21st CENTURY

Harvard School of Public Health
September 28–30, 2015
Boston, MA
Every day, more information is generated and made available to the public and people are accessing this information in real time across platforms. While the frequency and scale of disasters may not have changed significantly, people’s access to unfiltered information about these crises presents a significant new risk – one possibly as dangerous as the hazard itself. There are many public health implications of these developments, but the challenges posed by communicating risk to engender the desired response among the public are the most far-reaching.  This applied program will provide state-of-the-science knowledge on designing effective risk communication messages to improve communication outcomes, increase trust in your organization, reduce public anxiety about an issue, and help key stakeholders make better decisions.

SCIENCE, POLICY AND RISK FORUM

Retrospective Analysis of Significant Rules: APHIS Avocado Import Regulations
USDA Animal and Plant Inspection Service, Policy and Program Development
Sponsored by: ORACBA and National Capital Area Chapter of the Society for Risk Analysis
10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.
Rm 4433 U.S. Department of Agriculture South Building
Washington, DC
Agencies can benefit from reviewing past regulatory actions to better understand if anticipated outcomes differ from observed outcomes and if there were any unintended consequences of the regulation. APHIS is developing a framework to conduct retrospective analyses of significant rules. Using regulations of avocado imports as a case study, we assess the accuracy of our economic projections concerning domestic production and prices, consumption, and trade. We revisit issues raised in public comments to the proposed rule to assess how we would respond to the issues today, given the additional data that is now available. We anticipate using this framework to look back at additional significant rules to incorporate lessons learned from prior actions for future analyses.

Attend via webinar: Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4088724571215762434
Webinar ID: 153-842-011

Attend in person:  Please register by contacting Jennifer Lohr at jlohr@oce.usda.gov or 202-720-8024.
USDA employees may enter the building at the Wing 1 entrance, located directly above the Smithsonian Metro station. All others must bring a valid government picture ID and enter through Wing 3, located on Independence Ave, between 12th and 14th Streets. When exiting the Smithsonian Metro station turn left, the Wing 3 entrance is half way down the block. For escort to the forum, please have guards call Teresa Pickett Wade at 202-720 8022. For further information, contact Linda Abbott 202-690-6056 or mailto: labbott@oce.usda.gov.

HOARDING,  HOUSING,  AND PESTS: A NEW APPROACH

Cornell University
Sponsored by StopPests in Housing
August 4, 2015, Noon – 1:30pm EDT
Learn about a new approach to address hoarding in multifamily housing, and its impact on pest control. Through a partnership with the Boston University (BU) School of Social Work, BU School of Public Health, and the University of Nebraska, Omaha, the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) learned that clutter is often associated with an increase in pest reports among their residents. This can certainly be an obstacle to implementing a successful integrated pest management program. In this webinar, learn how housing providers (and partners) can use BHA’s experience, tools, and intervention program to train their staff to help residents with clutter and hoarding issues. You and your staff will learn how to recognize, flag units, and rate the severity of clutter or potential hoarding, then hear about an intervention that can empower residents to address these behaviors.
Speakers, John Kane (BHA) and Jordana Muroff (Boston University

GLOBAL HEALTH RISK FRAMEWORK MEETING

The first meeting of the Commission on a Global Health Risk Framework for the Future will take place July 28-29, 2015 at the National Academy of Sciences building, located at 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, in Washington, DC. The meeting will be entirely closed on July 28, but will be open to the public on July 29 from 9 am to 1 pm.
The objectives of the open session on July 29 include the following:

  • The International Oversight Group will present the Statement of Task to the Commission and make clarifications, if needed.
  • An expert panel will address issues of governance, finance, resilient health systems, and medical products research and development when responding to infectious disease outbreaks of international concern at the global, regional, national, and local levels. The Commission will consider the different perspectives presented, as they develop the approach for this study.

APPLIED RISK COMMUNICATION FOR THE 21st CENTURY

Harvard School of Public Health
September 28–30, 2015
Boston, MA
Every day, more information is generated and made available to the public and people are accessing this information in real time across platforms. While the frequency and scale of disasters may not have changed significantly, people’s access to unfiltered information about these crises presents a significant new risk – one possibly as dangerous as the hazard itself. There are many public health implications of these developments, but the challenges posed by communicating risk to engender the desired response among the public are the most far-reaching.  This applied program will provide state-of-the-science knowledge on designing effective risk communication messages to improve communication outcomes, increase trust in your organization, reduce public anxiety about an issue, and help key stakeholders make better decisions.

JIFSAN’s 2015 Annual Symposium, Re-tool Your Box: Communicating Food Risks in an Era of Social Media

November 4-5, 2015
Greenbelt Marriott Hotel
Greenbelt, MD

JIFSAN Courses

The increasing emphasis on risk-based decision making and the increasingly global nature of the food supply have resulted in the use of risk analysis to systematically address food safety issues worldwide. This has created a need to educate food safety and other public health professionals about the principles of food safety risk analysis and the tools and techniques required to apply this approach. For a detailed course description, or to register, visit our website at: http://risk.jifsan.umd.edu/registration/