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U.S. Forest Service Wants You to Get in Where You Fit In!

Posted by Tiffany Holloway, Office of Communication, US Forest Service in Forestry
Oct 16, 2012
Maples show a variety of colors on the Superior National Forest. Photo: Steve Robertsen, District Interpreter, Tofte Ranger District of the Superior National Forest
Maples show a variety of colors on the Superior National Forest. Photo: Steve Robertsen, District Interpreter, Tofte Ranger District of the Superior National Forest

Every fall, nature puts on a dazzling show across America’s great outdoors for all of us to see.

Whether you’re an adventurist or someone who just likes a good road trip, national forests are the places to be this time of year.

The U.S. Forest Service manages 193 million acres of forests and grasslands, many of which offer spectacular views of fall colors, whether leaves on trees or flowers on meadows and grasslands.

A layer of green, yellow, and red leaves surround a road that winds past the birch and Sawtooth Mountains on the Superior National Forest. Photo: Steve Robertsen, District Interpreter, Tofte Ranger District of the Superior National Forest
A layer of green, yellow, and red leaves surround a road that winds past the birch and Sawtooth Mountains on the Superior National Forest. Photo: Steve Robertsen, District Interpreter, Tofte Ranger District of the Superior National Forest

Here’s a list of five cool places to visit soon:

  1. The adventurist. You might enjoy Gravelly Mountains located in Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forests, which has elevations of 6,000 to 7,000 feet. There is an abundance of color there in southwest Montana.
  2. The hiker. Superior National Forest in Minnesota might be of interest to you. It is known for having an array of fall colors. Districts such as Laurentian, Tofte and LaCroix are perfect places to hike and take in a spectacular setting.
  3. The roadie. An excellent, scenic route is Longhouse Scenic Byway. It makes a loop through the Alleghany National Forest in Pennsylvania. By mid-October, the foliage is in full peak.
  4. The photographer. Lights, camera, action! Whether you’re a professional photog or a nature-loving shutterbug, you’ll enjoy the Point Iroquois Lighthouse. This area is ideal for viewing the pristine landscapes of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.
  5. The observer. Laid back?  A good place for the more casual viewer is Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway in north central New Mexico.

Whatever your preference, you’ll find something to enjoy on your national forests.

Call the National Forest Fall Colors hotline at 1-800-354-4595 for an inclusive list of areas to visit this season.

Yellow and green leaves highlight the Britten Peak Trail on the Superior National Forest. Photo: Steve Robertsen, District Interpreter, Tofte Ranger District of the Superior National Forest
Yellow and green leaves highlight the Britten Peak Trail on the Superior National Forest. Photo: Steve Robertsen, District Interpreter, Tofte Ranger District of the Superior National Forest
Category/Topic: Forestry

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Comments

John D. George
Oct 30, 2012

The US Forest Service is currently locking 1000's of Americans out of public lands, have you not seen the Travel Management Plan. Be prepared you are probably going to get several replys and they aren't going to be positive feedback.