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Staying Up-beet in Minnesota!

Posted by Amy Schober, Office of Food Safety, Food and Nutrition Service in Food and Nutrition
Sep 21, 2017
Viking Hummus with a bag of vegetables
Beets are the special ingredient for Viking Hummus. Students are given bags of fresh vegetables to dip into this nutritious, student-tested treat.

Secretary Perdue has proclaimed September “National Food Safety Education Month (PDF, 346 KB)“. To celebrate, USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service is developing innovative food safety trainings for school nutrition professionals and honoring training graduates like Barbara Griffiths MSBA, RD, SNS, who make safe and nutritious foods a priority in their programs. As a graduate of USDA’s Produce Safety University, Griffiths has learned to source local fruits and vegetables from growers within her community and turn them into innovative menu items!

Why is produce safety so important? Without cooking produce, there is no “kill” step to destroy pathogens that may be on our food. By understanding how to mitigate the risk factors associated with fresh produce, school nutrition professionals play a vital role in ensuring safe and nutritious produce for their students. In 2018, Produce Safety University will again train over 150 school nutrition professionals, who, like Griffiths, will be prepared to promote produce in school meals and help others to do the same. In October, state agencies can nominate school nutrition professionals to attend USDA’s Produce Safety University training.

By Nicole Chimbetete, University of Minnesota School of Public Health Graduate Student

Located just south of St. Paul, Minn., the Independent School District (ISD)-169 Food and Nutrition Department has made it a priority to implement the USDA Farm to School program throughout the school year. The USDA’s Produce Safety University helps ISD-169 serve a ‘Local Lunch Food’ at least once a month. These lunch options are locally grown, produced and sourced from Minnesota’s beloved farmers and manufacturers.

Root vegetables are an essential part of traditional Minnesotan diets. To celebrate National Farm to School Month in 2016, it was no surprise that the district took on the challenge of adding beetroot to a contemporary favorite – hummus! The result: A bright red-purple, lemony, super creamy and flavorful snack full of vitamins and minerals. The new menu item’s name, “Viking Hummus,” alludes to the pride in the local National Football League team. Throughout the month, the beet hummus recipe went through multiple reviews, involving focus groups and student taste tests. After receiving a 90 percent approval rating, the recipe went mainstream and was distributed throughout the schools in November for the Local Lunch Food.

USDA’s Produce Safety University offers a one-week training course which helps school foodservice staff identify and manage food safety risks associated with fresh produce. After attending this training course, District Food and Nutrition Supervisor, Barbara Griffiths, began to envision how safe, local produce could be brought into ISD-196, despite Minnesota’s short growing season. The first step was to identify community partners who could overcome seasonal supply fluctuations to provide high-quality, safe produce. Griffiths developed a key partnership with Bushel Boy Farms, a hydroponic greenhouse farm in Owatonna, Minn., that grows great-tasting tomatoes throughout the school year. The district partners with other growers to source menu items such as apples from Rabideaux’s Fruit Company and beets used in “Viking Glory” from Pahl’s Market. Griffiths likes buying directly from these local farmers because the shortened supply chain alleviates some food safety concerns, provides the freshest tasting product and reduces the carbon footprint through efficient delivery systems.

ISD 169’s Food and Nutrition Department hopes their efforts to integrate local foods into school meals will make students excited about nutrition, motivate them to prepare foods at home and contribute to their positive attitudes towards healthy life long eating habits, which will foster a healthier community for generations to come.

Beets
Beets arrive to Griffiths from Pahl’s Market in Apple Valley, Minn., where staff work with the school district to educate students about gardening and farming.
Category/Topic: Food and Nutrition

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Comments

David Quintana
Oct 01, 2017

Can you share the Viking Hummus recipe?

Ben Weaver
Oct 02, 2017

@David Quintana - thanks for your interest in this healthy recipe,

ISD 196 (Rosemount, Apple Valley, Eagan), MN

Beet Hummus (Purple Pride/Vikings)

Yield: 16 servings (4 Qt)
Serving Size: 1 cup

Ingredients

2.5 lbs raw, whole beets
1 #10 can garbanzo beans
1 1/3 cup Tahini
1 1/3 cup Lemon Juice
2 tbsp Salt
1 1/3 cups Oil
4.5oz minced garlic

Production

Beets:

Scrub the roots clean while cutting off any tops and bumps. Cut beets in half.

Pour ¼ cup of water into a half-size hotel pan.

Place beet halves face down in the hotel pan and steam until easily penetrated with a knife or fork. This will take 25 minutes. Peel once they have cooled and dice into ¼ inch cubes. KEEP THE WATER for processing.

Method

Place all ingredients in Robocoup food processor (or blender) and add all the beet juice from the hotel pan. Pulse while adding more water and stirring as needed. Blend until smooth.

Serving suggestions: Eat with pita chips, or with sliced cucumber or celery, or carrots

For distribution to other schools: double-bag the product in plastic bags at the specified amounts and freeze. 

HAACP

Hold cool at 41ᵒ C while serving.

Store leftovers in the refrigerator for up to 5 days or freeze for longer storage.

J Roy
Feb 16, 2018

What a great idea to incorporate beets with the National football league !!