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Bringing You Food and Fiber to Fit Your Active Lifestyle

Posted by Darryl Earnest, Agricultural Marketing Service Deputy Administrator in Food and Nutrition Research and Science
Feb 21, 2017
America's ag promotion groups are dedicated to helping fuel and inspire active, health-conscious consumers. Photo courtesy of AMS.
America's ag promotion groups are dedicated to helping fuel and inspire active, health-conscious consumers. Photo courtesy of AMS.

If you’ve learned how to cut a mango from a magazine article, read about new fabrics on a website or heard about nutrition research on almonds from a health reporter on TV, chances are one of America’s ag promotion groups made that information possible and available. From the clothes you wear to the food you eat, these groups are leading efforts to research and promote food and fiber that fits your lifestyle.

Active Wear
Consumers love “the touch, the feel” of cotton, but sometimes they want higher performance from the fabrics they wear. So textile chemists, working on behalf of the Cotton Research and Promotion Program, developed a technological breakthrough in moisture management active-wear. TransDRY technology is an innovative new finish for cotton performance apparel.

TransDRY is named for its unique ability to quickly transfer moisture away from the skin and move the moisture to the outside of the fabric, where it can dry faster. Cotton fabrics made with the TransDRY technology maintain the comfort and softness of cotton while staying dry because of the transfer of moisture. This technology has been adopted by a wide range of companies.

Nutrition to Fuel an Active Lifestyle
There’s power in the crunch of almonds. They help satisfy and provide energy to tackle any recreational challenge, and they’re easy to toss in the gym bag or backpack. The Almond Board of California notes that almonds are the tree nut highest in protein, calcium, vitamin E, riboflavin and niacin (1 mg/oz). Just one ounce (about 23 almonds) contains 6 grams of protein, 4 grams of fiber and 13 grams of “good” monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat.

Scientific research continues to suggest that protein can play a role in weight management. Emerging studies indicate a moderate increase in dietary protein each day, combined with a physically active lifestyle and energy-controlled diet, may improve the body’s ability to retain muscle mass during weight loss, maintain a healthy weight and feel satisfied.

You might be surprised to learn that most consumers are eating 65 percent of their protein at the dinner meal, leaving only about 35 percent for the rest of the day. Current research suggests that eating protein throughout the day so that it’s more evenly consumed. For some ideas on how to make that work, check out this beef and egg breakfast mug recipe courtesy of the Beef Board.

Beef and egg breakfast mug.  Current research encourages redistributing protein throughout the day so that it’s more evenly consumed. Photo courtesy of AMS.
Beef and egg breakfast mug. Current research encourages redistributing protein throughout the day so that it’s more evenly consumed. Photo courtesy of AMS.

Lean pork has been added to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension—or DASH—eating plan. Purdue University researchers found that when lean pork was included in the diet, the blood pressure benefits were the same as chicken and fish. Regardless of the protein source, study participants' systolic blood pressure dropped about eight to nine points and their diastolic number decreased about four to five points after six weeks. Check out this lean Asian spiced pork tenderloin with apricot sauce from the National Pork Board.

Overseeing these industry groups is one of the many ways that USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) helps farmers and their businesses successfully reach new markets. Supported by resources pooled from farmers, importers, and processors, these groups are helping feed and clothe a healthier population.

Purdue University researchers found that when lean pork was included in the diet, the blood pressure benefits were the same as chicken. Photo courtesy of AMS.
Purdue University researchers found that when lean pork was included in the diet, the blood pressure benefits were the same as chicken. Photo courtesy of AMS.

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