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Working the Night Shift - Bats Play an Important Role in Pollinating Crops

Posted by Pattie Thomas, Natural Resources Conservation Service in Conservation Forestry
Feb 21, 2017
Mexican free-tailed bats exiting Bracken Bat Cave. Photo credit: USFWS/Ann Froschauer
Mexican free-tailed bats exiting Bracken Bat Cave. Photo credit: USFWS/Ann Froschauer

Most people associate pollination with bees and birds but often forget the work of their furry colleagues: bats. Bats take the night shift, playing a major role in pollinating crops and spreading seeds.

One important bat is the Mexican long-nose bat, which dwells in large colonies. Their range includes the southern parts of Texas, California, New Mexico and Arizona.

Throughout time, plants and mammals have shared a dependency on one another that is mutually beneficial. So naturally, these bats feed on flowers, including those of valuable commercial crops, like figs, dates, mangoes and peaches, which have flowers that only open at night.

These mammal pollinators are finicky eaters with a specific palate. Dining on plant pollen and drinking sweet nectar is a delicacy at its batty-best. They tend to enjoy a flower that’s mild in scent and not bright in color. Simply speaking, white or pale crop flowers attract the night pollinators to feed on them.

Mexican long-nose bats can fly extensive distances to gather nectar from specific plants.

A lesser long-nosed bat pollinates a cross section of a saguaro cactus flower. Photo by Merlin D. Tuttle, Bat Conservation International.
A lesser long-nosed bat pollinates a cross section of a saguaro cactus flower. Photo by Merlin D. Tuttle, Bat Conservation International.

“When they are in Texas and New Mexico, they feed on the nectar of agave flowers too,” said Cyndee Watson, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The common feeding features of pollinating bats are elongated snouts and tongues, combined with smaller and fewer teeth. This aids in the rapid collection of nectar.

“Bats get pollen on their faces and bodies and go to the next flower. That is how cross pollination happens,” Watson said.

Mexican long-nose bats visit up to 30 flowers each night, feeding and transporting pollen.

They use a sonar system, through which the echoes of sound waves determine the shapes of surrounding objects. Because the powerful echoes emit higher frequencies and vibrations, bats can detect the existence of swift flying predators, too.

The seeds and fruits that compose part of our diet would not exist without the interaction between flowering plants and pollinators, including bats. Bats serve a purpose with other popular pollinators, and they’re just as important as the day shift birds and bees, which feed on daytime flowering plants.

Some states where large populations of bats live are also working to ensure bats always have a place to call home after a nighttime feeding.

“Texas is trying to install bat condo structures where the furry friends can make a home,” said James Rogers, a wildlife biologist with USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service.

NRCS works with farmers, ranchers and forest landowners to implement conservation practices on the ground that have numerous environmental benefits, including ones that provide habitat and food for pollinators.

For example, through the 2014 Farm Bill, landowners have an opportunity to receive financial assistance through conservation programs and practices, which can include planting cover crops and riparian buffers that target these beneficial pollinators. Bats’ survival depends on improved conservation practices to ensure they have healthy ecosystems to hang around in.

Throughout the summer, wildlife biologists conduct nighttime surveys to learn more about the many bats that live in the Coconino National Forest. Scientists gather information about species, population, and habitat. This bat from the genus Myotis is having its wing examined. Credit: USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest
Throughout the summer, wildlife biologists conduct nighttime surveys to learn more about the many bats that live in the Coconino National Forest. Scientists gather information about species, population, and habitat. This bat from the genus Myotis is having its wing examined. Credit: USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest
Category/Topic: Conservation Forestry

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Comments

Celesta Dunston
Oct 29, 2014

I enjoyed reading this article. It was very informative!

Leon Colvin
Oct 29, 2014

Very timely article, especially for Halloween. Thanks for helping the public understand that bats do more than just hang out in caves and scaring the daylights out of people! It turns out that these bats in particular are very helpful in maintaining our ecosystem.

Anna
Oct 29, 2014

Great article. Along with bees, we depend so much on these creatures!

DARRYL GOODMAN
Oct 29, 2014

Great Article.

Gary Brielmayer
Oct 31, 2014

very interesting article. We live in the Florida Panhandle and are interested in any programs to help improve the habitat for bats on our farm. Can some one assist us.

thank you.

Ben Weaver
Nov 03, 2014

@Gary Brielmayer - thank you so much for your comment and interest in pollinators, natural resources conservation and healthy ecosystems. NRCS works with private landowners to implement a variety of conservation practices, which can help pollinators like bats. There are opportunities for landowners to apply for and receive technical and financial assistance through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program and other Farm Bill programs to implement a variety of conservation practices. Contact your <a href="http://offices.sc.egov.usda.gov/locator/app?agency=nrcs&quot; rel="nofollow">local USDA service center</a> to learn more.

Kimm
Nov 04, 2014

Thank you for keeping us informed about bats. Thanks to the NRCS and Forest Service, I learned a lot when the "bat" guy came to visit USDA. Without that educational event, I'd still think bats were scary. How can suburban neighborhoods help?

Devie
Nov 13, 2014

Great article; very informative.

Beatriz Moisset
Nov 17, 2014

Bats pollinate cacti, yes, but they do not pollinate any of the other plants listed in this article. Figs are pollinated exclusively by fig wasps. Dates are pollinated mostly by wind. Mangoes by wind, flies, butterflies and moths. Peaches do not bloom at night but during the day and are mostly pollinatd by bees; flies and other flower visitors may contribute to their pollination. None of those flowers have floral syndrome suitable for bat pollination. Please, correct that terrible mistake.

David Tuttle
Jul 23, 2018

Bats are the saver in every term! there are over 1,100 different species of bats that consume huge amounts of insects, including mosquitoes. Some bats can consume as much as 1,000 insects in an hour. Certain other bats also pollinate plants, which is another crucial part of our ecosystem cycle. Even bat droppings, also called guano, is used as a natural fertilizer. Guano works every bit as good as cow patties for fertilizer.

Mitul Desai
Aug 06, 2021

It is very informative and qurious to know about Bats there behaviour,feeding habits, breeding etc . I am interested in studing this creatures.