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USDA Grain Inspectors Work to Uphold America's Reputation for Quality, Support New Markets

Posted by Elvis Cordova, Deputy Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs in USDA Results Trade
Feb 21, 2017
Deputy Undersecretary of Agriculture Elvis Cordova touring the newly renovated control room at the Louis Dreyfus elevator at the port of Houston
Deputy Undersecretary of Agriculture Elvis Cordova tours the newly renovated control room at the Louis Dreyfus elevator at the port of Houston. (USDA Photo)

As America’s leadership role in the global economy increases, shipments of American grain, oil seeds, and related agricultural products could continue expanding into promising markets in some of the world’s most robust economies. Facilitating the marketing of U.S. grain exports by thorough inspection and weight certification in accordance with Federal law is the job of the Grain Inspection, Packers, and Stockyard Administration (GIPSA) through its Federal Grain Inspection Service (FGIS).

A team of dedicated professionals located around the country ensures that America remains competitive in the world agricultural market by upholding the quality of U.S. grain as well as the integrity of U.S. grading standards. Working shifts around the clock in export elevators loading ocean vessels and in interior locations loading shipping containers along the Great Lakes, the Gulf of Mexico, on coastal and other locations, FGIS personnel along with delegated states and designated agencies inspect and weigh grain arriving daily by truck, rail, and barge for domestic markets and export by cargo ships. Once loading is complete, FGIS inspectors provide an official certificate backed by the reputation and authority of the U.S. Government.

Having recently visited FGIS facilities at the Ports of Houston and New Orleans, I witnessed FGIS inspectors work meticulously at export elevators to guarantee that inspections are conducted in the most effective manner possible. I was extremely impressed by the efficiency of FGIS personnel. Not only are they exceedingly aware of their role in facilitating international shipments of U.S. grains, but they are also dedicated to the economic prosperity of American farmers by certifying that the quality of U.S. grains remains of the highest standard in the world.

The accuracy of FGIS inspections is currently 96.9 percent and FGIS scientists and staff continuously seek to improve performance. At the National Grain Center in Kansas City, Missouri sophisticated grain testing and innovative exploration to improve grain quality assurance are ongoing.

Last year FGIS staff and its partners from delegated states and agencies facilitated more than 3 million inspections on 298 million metric tons of grain and oil seeds with 126 million metric tons of exports totaling over $45 billion—at a cost-effective rate of one penny per bushel.  As America’s trade integration expands throughout the world, GIPSA and its team of grain inspectors and scientists offer a promising platform for continued economic growth for rural America.

Deputy Undersecretary of Agriculture Elvis Cordova (right) touring a grading laboratory during a recent visit to GIPSA facilities in League City, Texas and the port of Houston
Deputy Undersecretary of Agriculture Elvis Cordova (right) tours a grading laboratory during a recent visit to GIPSA facilities in League City, Texas and the port of Houston. (USDA Photo)
Category/Topic: USDA Results Trade

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Comments

Ann oneill
Jul 13, 2015

Please inspect animal park in Jones penn.they r in violation of cruelty to animals . Check lion cub who has been beaten

Ben Weaver
Jul 17, 2015

@Ann oneill - thank you for your comment, and we take all such complaints seriously – they are looked at and investigated when action warrants it.