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1994 land grant institution

The Value of Tribal Agricultural Traditions: A Youth Perspective

Food sovereignty – the ability to create a self-sufficient food system – is at the heart of the opportunities and challenges facing the Navajo Nation. This spring, Diné College students Tyler Begay, Korrie Johnnie, and Orean Roy were recognized for their exploration of this topic during the American Indian Higher Education Consortium Student Conference in Billings, Montana.

Tribal Colleges: Acknowledging the Past, Understanding the Present, and Aspiring to a Successful Future

Oct. 20, 1994, is an important milestone in our nation’s history in regards to equity in research, education, and extension. On that date, 29 tribal colleges, representing different histories, cultural orientations, and organizational structures, received land-grant university (LGU) status. Such LGU status gave these institutions—referred to as 1994 LGUs—access to federal resources to help improve the lives of tribal students, while respecting sovereignty and promoting self-sufficiency in American Indian communities. In the ensuing 23 years, significant progress has occurred in building capacity at the 1994 land-grant system to better serve Native American students and communities.