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Keeping Cranberries on the Thanksgiving Menu

For many families, a Thanksgiving meal would not be the same without the sweet, tart goodness of cranberry dishes. A project funded by USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) at Oregon State University (OSU) is working to ensure that staple stays on the table.

Unpacking a Career in Agriculture with Assist from USDA’s Economic Research Service

From an early age, Sarah Baskins had in interest in agriculture. This interest accelerated when she became Merced College Agricultural Business Student of the Year. While studying for her Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Studies and Economics at California State University, Stanislaus, Baskins had an important internship as an economist with USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS).

USDA Propels This Scientist’s Career Trajectory

You could say that Andreya Dupree is flying high with the USDA, Agricultural Research Service (ARS), partially due to being a licensed drone pilot. “USDA was the place that gave me a chance to continue to learn and grow. I've received many opportunities with USDA,” said Dupree.

Fun, Food, and Fitness for Healthy Families

Whether you are a family of two or a multigenerational household, nutrition and physical activity can help you and your loved ones stay healthy. Healthy food choices and regular exercise help kids of all ages grow and develop, and also supports adults and older adults maintain health and reduce the risk of chronic disease.

Fatty Acids and Mortality: ARS Scientists Get to the Heart of the Matter

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that one person dies every 36 seconds in the United States from cardiovascular disease. That’s about 25% of America’s mortality rate. Heart disease costs the United States about $363 billion each year from 2016 to 2017 – almost $1 billion per day.

Closer to Zero: Partnership to Protect Our Food

USDA is collaborating with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the Closer to Zero (C2Z) initiative. C2Z provides a crucial framework for the work that must be done to reduce heavy metal content in foods, but particularly in foods consumed by infants and children, our most vulnerable group.