Skip to main content

hbcu

USDA 1890 National Scholar Connects Field Work with Academics

Jordyn Ash, a sophomore at Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University (FAMU) in Tallahassee, is a USDA 1890 National Scholar studying plant and soil sciences. Ash applied to the USDA 1890 National Scholars Program during her senior year of high school. She recalls guidance counselors providing excellent summaries of different scholarship opportunities, but she decided that the USDA 1890 National Scholars Program offered the best fit for her career aspirations.

Hands-on Experience Helps USDA 1890 National Scholar Secure Permanent Position

When Lauren Hawkins graduated from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee, she had a job waiting for her. Thanks to her participation in the USDA 1890 National Scholars Program, she was hired right away as an agricultural engineer with USDA Natural Resources Conservation Science (NRCS).

Laser-Focused USDA 1890 National Scholar Builds Future with USDA

Kevin Poole, a recent graduate of Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University (FAMU), can remember the exact moment when he first learned about the USDA 1890 National Scholars Program. It was during the spring semester of his junior year of high school. “A school administrator grabbed me at lunch and said she wanted to tell me about this opportunity,” Poole said. “It just kept getting better and better as she told me about the program.”

USDA 1890 National Scholar Balances Responsibilities

Zakiah Goodlow, an Alabama native and sophomore at Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (A & M), credits the USDA 1890 National Scholar Program and USDA liaisons with helping her balance her many responsibilities. “[They] encourage me to enjoy the program,” she said. “They check in with me and make sure I’m doing okay.”

USDA 1890 National Scholars Program and USDA Liaisons Prepare Students for Their Future Careers

Arionne Patterson has come a long way since learning about the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) 1890 National Scholars Program during a presentation hosted at her high school in Fresno, California. As a result of pursing her agricultural dreams and the USDA 1890 National Scholars Program, Patterson obtained her Agriculture Business degree at Prairie View A&M University and her master’s degree at Purdue University.

Celebrating the Agricultural Impacts of 1890 Land-Grant Universities

USDA has a long history of investing in and supporting our nation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The 19 HBCUs established under the Second Morrill Act of 1890, along with the two HBCU land-grant universities established in the original 1862 legislation – University of the District of Columbia and University of the Virgin Islands – are a critical link in ensuring public access to agricultural education, research, and outreach programs are equitably distributed to all Americans. USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) supports research at these institutions with both capacity and competitive funding.