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Research and Science

Collaboration Across Agencies Supports Food Assistance Research

Who participates in federal food assistance programs, and how does participation affect their lives? Who doesn’t participate, and why not? Policymakers need high-quality data on such questions to make informed decisions about these programs, which affect millions of lives each year. That is why two USDA agencies are collaborating with the U.S. Census Bureau to produce research that sheds new light on the programs.

NIFA Programs Support Soil Health

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), one-third of the planet’s soils are degraded. This condition is caused by a number of natural factors, including wind and water erosion and nutrient imbalances, but people also leave an indelible impact on the earth. About 38 percent of the worlds’ surface is dedicated to agriculture to feed a population of 7.2 billion. That population is projected to increase to over 9 billion by 2050.

APHIS Leads Ongoing Series of Surveys and Studies about Antibiotic Use on Farms

The human and animal health communities recently celebrated World Antibiotic Awareness Week.  Did you know that USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) plays an important role in the conversation about antibiotic use?  We gather real-world data on the use of antimicrobial agents on U.S. farms – and you, the producers, can help us with our efforts.

What to Do with Your Leftover Turkey? The G20 Meeting of the Agricultural Chief Scientists May Have Some Insight

What should you have done with all of that leftover Thanksgiving turkey? Should you have frozen it, given it away, or composted it? Maybe these aren’t even the right questions. Should you have bought a smaller bird? What would you have done if you were in the country of Turkey? Or if you were in Japan?

Shedding New Light on Stink Bug Invasion

The invasive brown marmorated stink bug causes problems for homeowners and farmers and threatens U.S. specialty crops valued at over $20 billion. Farmers rely on insecticide sprays to reduce crop-damaging stink bugs. Another strategy is using traps with lures to capture this pest.